Draft Project: Investigating Nano in Nature

Scenario: Hello Nano-science Explorers, Welcome to the science conference on Nano in Nature. You have been asked here to this conference to consider how small is too small? To investigate nano organisms in the world around you. At this conference you will all be selecting one organism from the nanoscale and researching and investigating its existence. In science exploration groups you will need to investigate: 1) What nanoscience is; 2) How it exists in nature as organisms "living things" that are impossible to see with your eyes; and 3) Why are these organisms, why are they important in science; and 4) How do we see these organisms, what do we use to see these organisms and why do we need to know about organisms at the nanoscale.

Your job in your exploration teams is to produce a written research-based report for the conference portfolio with an accompanying audio podcast that details your investigation and provides detailed information on your nano- organism for the rest of the nano- scientist at the conference will listen to.

(Santa Barbara, Calif.) – "Nature was nano before nano was cool," stated Henry Fountain in a recent New York Times article on the proliferation of nanotechnology research projects. No one is more aware of this fact of nature than Dan Morse of the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research groups have been studying the ways that nature builds ocean organisms at the nanoscale for over ten years.

University of California , Santa Barbara

Dept. of Education and Early Childhood Development



Revised Draft Project:

Scenario: Hello Nano-science Explorers, Welcome to the Medical Science Conference on Viruses. You have been asked here to this conference to consider how small is too small and how viruses affect humans everywhere ? To investigate viruses in the world around you. At this conference you will all be selecting one nanoscale virus and then researching and investigating its existence. In science exploration groups you will need to investigate: 1) What nanoscience is; 2)

Your job in your exploration teams is to produce a written research-based report for the conference portfolio with an accompanying audio podcast that details your investigation and provides detailed information on your virus for the rest of the nano- scientist at the conference to listen to.

Nano-manipulator:
"It's all part of a lesson in nanoscience- the study of matter at a scale of one-billionth of a meter."

"Viruses, which are smaller than bacteria and cells, exist on the nanometer scale. And because everybody has dealt with a stomach virus or flu, researchers say viruses act as a springboard to get students interested and engaged in nanotechnology, as well as science in general." NCNanotechnology

ncnanotechnology.com

List of Viruses on Wikepidia
List of Viruses

Home of Cells alive!

Netlogo-Virus...
Discuss the nanoscale-


Then show the following video:
NanoScale
http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=5jqQxuVncmc

Nanotechnology to end insulin injections for diabetics

http://www.smartplanet.com/people/video/nanotechnology-to-end-insulin-injections-for-diabetics/370926


Lesson 1: Introduction to Google Groups and PBL Scenario

Lesson Overview

In this lesson, students are introduced to the class Google Groups website where they will access online information and instructions for the unit, record and archive essential learning points, and upload their final problem based learning report and podcast. Students are also provided with the overarching problem-based learning scenario.

Part A: Setting up the Google Groups
  • Prior to the lesson, students will need to sign up for a gmail account (follow the procedures from the ITEST summer workshop).
  • Enter all student's email addresses.
  • Preassign students to groups of four.
  • Discuss the Google Group environment and how students will use it to keep notes from their investigations, share information, and access resources that others may upload.
  • Have students work together in their small groups to choose a name for their group, write a short two-sentence profile, and place the information onto their own page.

Part B: Virus PBL Scenario

  • Set the context by asking students that solicit prior knowledge about different kinds of viruses, e.g., What do you know about viruses? What kinds of viruses are there? (AIDS, Flu, ebola), How are viruses usually detected? How are viruses usually treated? How does it affect the body? Do you know anyone who has been affected by a virus? WHta happens?
  • Discuss that in the next 10 lessons, the class will participate in a series of investigations that focuses on researched based investigations on different viruses and their relationship to nanoscience. Explain that they will be doing different kinds of research in order to provide a solution to the following problem.
  • On a handout (or electronic document) provide the PBL scenario:


Scenario: Hello Nano-science Explorers, Welcome to the Medical Science Conference on Viruses. You have been asked here to this conference to consider how small is too small and how viruses affect humans everywhere ? To investigate viruses in the world around you. At this conference you will all be selecting one nanoscale virus and then researching and investigating its existence. In science exploration groups you will need to investigate: 1) What nanoscience is; 2)

Your job in your exploration teams is to produce a written research-based report for the conference portfolio with an accompanying audio podcast that details your investigation and provides detailed information on your virus for the rest of the nano- scientist at the conference to listen to.

  • On the same handout, list the assignment parameters in detail. Include assignment length, components that must be included (e.g, summary of results from the NetLogo experiments, results of ferrofluid tests, web research), information to be included in the podcast.
  • Distribute the rubric for grading the assignment (sample found on the flash drive)
  • Show the following two short videos to introduce the topic. The first one provides a short history of the origins of nanoscience as illustrated by Richard Feynman and the second is a short video about nanoscience and viruses.
  • Ask students to jot down what they